Good Reads 06.07.18 (on: life satisfaction, identity, and more!)

Here is a collection of good reads gathered from across the internet this past week. Enjoy!

On being a father: When Your Son Needs Fatherly Approval by David McLemore

I know too few men who feel the approval of their fathers. They grow up wondering if they’re pleasing to him. For some, that uncertainty results in rebellion. For others, it results in man-pleasing. In either case, it’s a tragedy. Some sons do disappoint their fathers. But, by and large, I would guess that most sons by the fact that they’re sons have their father’s approval. They just don’t know it because their fathers never say it. They navigate childhood hoping the home-run will bring praise, the A-filled report card will elicit pride, or the diploma will ensure proof of pleasure. They go into adulthood wondering if their job is enough not only to provide for their future family but enough to please their father’s expectations. Are they man enough? Are they good enough? Are they a disappointment? (click here to read more)

On finding satisfaction in life: The When, Thens of Life by Molly Ann Hilbert

I believe I have value because of what I do, because of my productivity level, because of the amount of output my life produces.

I forget that I have value simply because I am His.

I come back to J. Campbell White’s quote: “Nothing can wholly satisfy the life of Christ within His followers except the adoption of Christ’s purpose toward the world He came to redeem… The men who are putting everything into Christ’s undertaking are getting out of life its sweetest and most priceless rewards.”

But what, exactly, is Christ’s undertaking? (click here to read more)

On identity: You Are Who God Says You Are by Greg Morse

If you have been reborn, if you are repenting of your sin and believing the gospel, you are a child of God. And this status comes with authority: “To all who did receive him, who believed in his name, he gave authority to become children of God, who were born not of blood, nor of the will of the flesh, nor of the will of man, but of God” (John 1:12–13).

You may not feel particularly childlike, you may not be enjoying his word every morning, but do not let the Liar convince you that you are not a child of the King. The question can never be, “Who are you to go to God in prayer?” The question now is, “Who are you to stay away when the King has invited you?” (click here to read more)

On waiting on God: What To Do While You Wait on the Lord by Mike Leake

The second point that I’m making is that when the Lord places us in a season of waiting that doesn’t mean it is a season of passivity. Waiting on the Lord means doubling down on gathering with believers, prayer, and obeying the Scriptures. Being told by the Lord to “wait” doesn’t mean to be frozen. It means to faithfully dig in to the things that you do know. Be obedient in the disciplines and diligently dig into the Scriptures and apply them. That’s what you do while you wait. (click here to read more)

Good Reads 08.31.16 (on: quietness, a greater love for God, and more!)

Here is a collection of good reads gathered from across the internet this past week. Enjoy!

On fathering: 6 Things a Godly Dad Does by Scott Slayton

A man can only be an effective father as he continues to grow spiritually. Our marriage and parenting will be impacted by our sin and lack of maturity. We will be impatient, temperamental, rude, thoughtless, and respond sinfully to being sinned against, so our only option is to keep growing in holiness and sanctification. Putting to death the sin in our lives and growing in Christlike maturity will have a practical effect on the way we lead our homes. (click here to read more)

On Bible reading: One Very Good Reason to Read Your Bible by Tim Challies

But the benefit of personal devotions goes far beyond self. The benefit of knowledge of God and intimacy with God extends to your family, to your neighbors, to your church. If you can’t or won’t do devotions for your own sake, won’t you do it for the sake of others? Won’t you do it for their good, even if not for your own? (click here to read more)

On praying for a greater love for God: Lord, Enlarge My Love for You by Jon Bloom

What drives the Christian life is the great joy set before us (Hebrews 12:2), causing us to forget what lies behind and press on toward the goal for the eternal prize of God in Christ Jesus (Philippians 3:13–14). The Christian’s approach to life is to attain the resurrection from the dead “by any means possible” (Philippians 3:11). Whatever it takes. (click here to read more)

On making time for quietness before God: Quiet by Rachel Erin

It could be that we need to actually turn off the television, close our laptops, or adjust the notification settings on our phones. It could also mean that we are deliberate in the activities we say “yes” to for our families and ourselves. When we fail (which will happen often), it means taking time to refocus our hearts on the sufficiency of the gospel and Christ’s sacrifice for us instead of rehearsing our inadequacies over and over.  (click here to read more)

On church: 8 Reasons Every Church is Messy by Chuck Lawless

The gospel is intended to reveal messiness. Think about it—that’s precisely what the gospel does. It shatters our prideful exteriors and reduces us to our messy core. If you preach the gospel, there’s some messiness you should welcome. (click here to read more)